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21st December 2018

Illegal Hunting – Eye Witness Accounts

Surrey Hunt Monitors call illegal hunting out.

On Wednesday I observed the Portman Hunt blatantly chasing foxes in Dorset.

At about 11.30am I saw two quad bikes and some riders appear over the brow of a low hill, then the Huntsman with his pack of hounds at heel. He took them to foxy-looking bit of rough ground and let them go off and sniff around. His voice calls encouraged them and he rolled his tongue in a way which has been practiced by generations of foxhunters and is designed to rouse their quarry.

After a while one hound started to bark. “Speaking,” hunters call it. Then another and another and within seconds all the twenty-odd hounds were on, actively hunting and speaking in unison, running in and out of thick hedges and undergrowth, back and fore between a woodyard and scrubland in pursuit of a fox who was, unseen, twisting and turning in front and trying to shake them off.

The Huntsman was cunningly wearing a black coat so as to blend in with other riders. Once things got going he stood back to make it look like he wasn’t in full control and could claim to a policeman or a Judge that any illegal foxhunting was accidental. Additionally, there were people scattered around in all directions on foot and no doubt some of them would claim they were “laying a trail”.

I knew they were illegally hunting but hadn’t seen the fox so didn’t report the crime.

Hounds hunted locally for well over half and hour. There was a quiet interlude before the noise started again. Can’t be certain what happened there but likely the fox had found a refuge and before the hunt could continue he had to be flushed out with smaller, specialist dogs. That’s why blokes follow on quad bikes equipped with terriers and spades. They deny it, of course they do, but actually it’s a fact.

Then I could see and hear, from my vantage, that the hunt had gone away. Before they disappeared from view they turned left-handed and after that I was unable to keep track.

I was with friends standing on guard on a piece of land where hunting is forbidden. At 12.50pm I saw a small dot moving, left to right, across a field in the distance and lifted my binoculars to have a closer look. It was a fox. I watched him for a few seconds until he ran out of view.

Sure enough, less than a minute later the whole pack poured through a hedge into that same field and followed precisely the same line as I had just seen the fox take. They disappeared from view in exactly the same place too. And following the hounds were the riders. Doubtless they were having a fine old time. “Just like the good old days,” you could almost hear them think.

That’s when I called the police on 101 and reported the illegal hunting as a wildlife crime. I explained exactly what I’d seen. I couldn’t stop the hunt and even if I had captured the scene on film (which I didn’t) the evidence wouldn’t have stood up to dishonest cross examination in a court of law. But at least it’s recorded and has become a statistic (Crime Log Number I19-186), which is important.

Modern day policing is statistics-led. This means that resources are allocated where, statistically, there is deemed to be most need.

My Sister-in-Law wrote the following short letter to the local paper after she witnessed and reported illegal foxhunting recently too (Crime Log Number 8-224), which we publish here because they didn’t.

“Standing in a back garden last Saturday (8 December) I was blessed with the scene of a fox running across the field beyond, its body full stretch as it sped over the grass underfoot.  My awe was quickly broken as only a few seconds later a pack of hounds emerged hot on the fox’s tail. To my shock I was witnessing the local hunt in full motion.

“Fox hunting has been illegal for many years so to see the hunt chasing a fox was a shock and deeply saddening.  There was nothing to suggest the hunt was going to call the hounds off, which is what I’ve since been told is supposed to happen.

“I am not naive in thinking that what I saw was anything other than what was intended … the chase … the kill and whatever it is that the people who take part in this type of sport get from doing this.

“I didn’t choose to see or be part of what happened just a few metres away from me that day, but it left me feeling distressed and angry.

“Why is it okay to flout the law in this cruel way?”

C Fawcett, Shaftesbury

© Joe Hashman

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  • Linda says:
    Posted December 28, 2018 at 12:29 pm

    MARGARET MARSH Christmas Eve 2018 Huntsman led pack of hounds and hunters to farm gate. Opened gate LED dogs to tree lined pond. The hunters started making weirdest and loudest noises I’ve ever heard. Then they gesticulated towards the field where I thought I could see something running at speed uphill. They all then proceeded following their dogs which were also going in that direction. Could not confirm if it was Hare or Fox too far away to be honest. Clearly not trail scenting. Have reported it 101 (crime No.28-156).

    I have no ulterior motive for this post but have bern moved to do so by what I saw)

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