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27th August 2015

Katie Angus & Friends Make History At The 148th Bucks County Show

Katie Angus from Buckinghamshire took an anti hunting message to the 2015 Bucks County Show for the first time in its 148 year history!

After a really long day, it’s time for an update!!

So for the first time in the 148 year history of Bucks County Show, today there was an anti-fox hunting presence! Myself & 2 good friends, accompanied by my good old dad, set up our modest table at the biggest agricultural show in the country! We had no idea what to expect to be honest. It was a first & anything was possible!

Our stand was really out of the way which was a shame but according to the organisers it was difficult to fit us in so late on. But there was a steady flow of visitors past the stand & lots of people who stopped by! Some to voice their support & encouragement for what we were doing, some who wanted to give us their pro Hunt views, most of which did so respectfully, & the odd person who just wanted to have a go at us!! Which we were prepared for.

We were told they had “been expecting trouble”! They certainly got no trouble from us. Other than a presence they clearly didn’t want. But we were professional & respectful to all who approached & we managed to educate several people about foxes & their behaviour, & to dispel a few myths which was our aim! Once you understand them, & the proven ineffectiveness of fox hunting, it’s extremely difficult for an empathetic & compassionate mind to see any justification for animals being chased to a death of being torn to bits by dogs! It was great to have the opportunity to do this, & to discuss the statistical facts of the ineffectiveness with pro Hunt supporters. I’m sure we also gave some of them some food for thought.

One pro Hunt supporter commended our efforts & said they were pleased we were there to reflect a balanced view.

Thankfully society is changing its attitudes towards bloodsports & animal welfare matters. In both rural & urban communities. Our presence today was a huge step forward for the majority of us who are opposed to fox hunting & in support of the ban. It’s a reflection of the shift in attitudes towards fox hunting & the fact it’s now an outdated pastime of a minority.

Going forwards, there are lots of plans to ensure this progress continues! We will of course be applying for a stand at next years Bucks County Show & this time, with a bit of help from other volunteers we’ll have time to put a proper stand together to give us a greater presence. The good news as well is that once you’ve been at the show once, you have a priority place the following year so hopefully it won’t be the same level of challenge it’s been this year. But if it is, that won’t put us off.

A committee of volunteers will be formed & across every region we will be targeting as many county shows as we have the resources to cover to ensure they follow in the footsteps of Bucks County Show in accepting a Pro Ban presence at next years shows. Thank you all so much for all the messages of support, for signing & sharing the petition & for helping me make this happen! This is just the beginning…..❤️ x

NOTE: Katies petition now stands at over 125,000! If you’ve not yet signed it please do so here: http://www.thepetitionsite.com/564/084/639/stop-bucks-county-show-from-promoting-fox-hunting/

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26th August 2015

First Beam Of Light To Shine On Showground In 148 Years

Remember that petition to the Bucks County Show asking them not to support illegal hunting? Well, something amazing has happened. Tomorrow near Aylesbury, for the first time in 148 years, a beam of light will be shining on the showground in the name of wildlife protection.

Katie Angus (who started the petition) from Buckinghamshire reminds us and updates this ongoing story…

There’s an old saying that if you want something with all your heart you’ll get it. What I want is an end to animal cruelty in the name of blood sports. Have I got it? Not yet.

What I do have though is a huge step forward. An opportunity to give these animals who are persecuted in the name of propaganda, a voice. A chance to dispel the pro Hunt myths that have been created over the years in an attempt to justify chasing a terrified animal to an unthinkable death of being torn apart by hounds. Can you imagine that being yourself for just one moment? A death of being chased, terrified, until you’re exhausted and then being torn apart by dogs. How can anyone consider this a sport when it’s another animal being killed so barbarically? And in the name of ‘fun’ or ‘entertainment’. To a person capable of empathy it’s unthinkable.

As I have mentioned previously, in a recent poll by the League Against Cruel Sports (LACS), 8 out of 10 people were opposed to fox hunting across all regions of the UK. Not one region had more Pro Hunt supporters than Pro Ban supporters. Including Buckinghamshire. So whilst I accept that the county show reflects rural life and “the best it has to offer” I find it quite disturbing that this would include the barbaric killing of animals for sport something to be proud of? Surely this isn’t the best it has to offer? Thankfully, the majority would agree with me.

With this in mind, I started the petition to Bucks County Show to challenge their decision to reflect the views of a minority by having the local hunt present at the show, and parading in the main ring! Whilst I knew the issue would generate a good level of support, the rate at which this support grew, from every corner of the globe, was staggering! Over 120,000 people have now shown their support and allowed my one voice to become the voice of hundreds of thousands!

This of course generated a lot of media attention, good and bad, but like they say, no publicity is bad publicity when you have a cause to support! Following several radio interviews I was made an offer. To apply for a stand at the County Show. As a busy working Mum with none of the literature and documentation you’d need for a county show I called upon the League Against Cruel Sports for some guidance and support. They, in turn, applied for a stall on my behalf and were rejected live on BBC Three Counties Radio, with no official explanation. We of course don’t need an explanation. The argument and evidence that the LACS have for the truth behind blood sports is overwhelming and this kind of presence would be unwelcome at a Show who have openly confirmed that they are in support of ‘legal’ country pursuits.

I was then made another offer. To attend the show myself. Just me. No support from a large organisation, or any organisation in fact. Just me, “and one other”. My immediate response was for my safety and I was informed that I will be positioned next to the police tent! Comforting. One of the most surprising responses I encountered publicly from people in support of the hunt was to belittle my concern for my welfare and that of my family. Not that I should be surprised really. If you are able to enjoy chasing a terrified animal to a brutal death it would suggest a severe lack of empathy. With no heart or soul it must be difficult to comprehend why a mother would be concerned for the welfare of her family. But there you are. Speaks volumes really.

However, I am extremely fortunate to have a wonderfully supportive family who understand how much this cause means to me and how close it is to my heart and they offered their full support in seeing this campaign through. With so much support behind me, refusing the offer was never an option.

So with that in mind I accepted their offer! The LACS hoped they would be able to provide me with a sponsor so I could benefit from the legal cover, etc needed for the show but this was again rejected. They have refused any direct involvement from the LACS.

So, I went back to the drawing board. I completed all the documents required personally and sourced my own public liability insurance. I also paid full price for the stand as wasn’t given the charity rate due to not being an official charity. I now had everything needed to complete my application. Trying to arrange this alongside being a working Mum of a very active toddler, who is of course my number 1 priority, and having my own commitments to fulfil was extremely challenging but with the support of my family and friends, including all of you, my fox family of friends, I was able to overcome each and every wall and today I was given confirmation that my application has been accepted!

A little bit of history has been made today and will be made tomorrow! It’s the first time in the 148 year history of the show that an Anti-Hunting presence has ever been allowed! It’s the first time these animals will have a voice there, albeit a small one in the form of myself and a few friends, but we’ll be there. Dispelling the myths and providing the truth, and offering advice on how we can help and protect our local wildlife! I am immensely proud to have been able to see this through to a result, for all of us, and while the presence of the hunt will still be included, the presence of the anti-hunt will also be there. For the first time ever.

It’s an amazing breakthrough that wouldn’t have been possible without the support of each and every signature and share! Thank you all so much for your continued support and while it might only be me stood there tomorrow, I’ll be stood there for all of us, and I know I’ve got you all behind me! Our presence is a reflection that we’re living in a Pro Ban society, one where animal cruelty is no longer tolerated or wanted, let alone in the name of sport. This is a big step forward and a significant breakthrough. For those we couldn’t save and for those we still can.

Katie x

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24th August 2015

The Fox Hunting Season Has Begun #keeptheban

Hunt riders holding-up maize in Dorset 22.08.15 pic: Dorset Wildlife Protection

A new season of fox hunting begins as soon as the harvest is in sufficiently to afford access to the land. In many parts of the country this means that during August, and certainly from September, hunts are out in force with horses, hounds and four-wheel drive vehicles.

Fox hunting in late summer and autumn is a prelude to the pomp and ceremony of the full season which runs mostly from end Oct/early Nov until March or April. Since the 2004 Hunting Act outlawed fox hunting, participants refer to autumn hunting as ‘hound exercise’. Before then it was known more honestly as ‘cub hunting’ (or ‘cubbing’ for short).

Hunt supporters may claim that what is described below is outdated because hunting is different since the Hunting Act. Actually, most of the evidence we have seen and heard suggests that very little has changed and the law is being widely flouted. Links at the bottom of this piece are evidence of this. Sure, there have been a few cosmetic tweaks which serve to confuse the issue, but the following is as true before the ban as now, ten years after. That’s why Hounds Off and many others are calling for the Hunting Act to be strengthened in ways which mean that foxes (and other abused wild animals) are afforded better protection.

The purpose of this article is to outline what cubbing is, what it looks like and how you can report it if you see it (or hear about it on the grapevine).

WHEN

Cubbing usually starts in the early morning at first light. This means from 6am in mid August, getting later as autumn comes. By mid October 9.30 or 10am is the norm. At the beginning of the day, before the sun is at its full power, hounds are able to smell foxes better. Hounds hunt by scent so are trained to do this at times when conditions are best. In the early season hunts may finish by mid morning or, in late September/October, by mid afternoon.

Evening hunts are popular too. Scent is often good later in the day and an evening ‘meet’ might combine killing foxes with a social occasion (such as a barbecue).

WHY

Cubbing is vital for hunting purposes.

The principle objective is training the hounds. They need to recognise the smell, look and taste of a fox as well as how to hunt as a pack. Dog packs will be large. Many are youngsters trying to make the grade. Some older, experienced hounds will be there too, to teach and lead by example.

Young hounds are best trained by hunting and killing a lot of foxes. Cubbing, especially early in the season, is a brutal and bloody affair (though mostly conducted out of sight).

Here’s what the late 10th Duke of Beaufort wrote in his 1980 David & Charles publication, Fox-Hunting, on pages 68/69 (the late Duke had massive status in the hunting world):

“The object of cub-hunting is to educate both young hounds and fox-cubs. As was said earlier, it is not until he has been hunted that the fox draws fully on his resources of sagacity and cunning so that he is able to provide a really good run….I try to be out cub-hunting as often as possible myself, and the ideal thing is for the Master to be out every day….Never lose sight of the fact that one really well-beaten cub killed fair and square is worth half a dozen fresh ones killed the moment they are found without hounds having to exert themselves in their task. It is essential that hounds should have their blood up and learn to be savage with their fox before he is killed.”

If one or two foxes do escape that’s good from a hunting perspective too. These foxes know to get up and running when hounds are about and are dispersed to all over the place to ensure a reliable spread of animals to chase. Later on, when punters pay a tidy fee for the privilege of ‘riding to hounds’, these are the foxes which are hoped to provide the best sport. Hunts are businesses, after all.

By harvest time this years litter of cubs look like young adults and are still in family units. Huntsmen already know where foxes are living. Farmers and gamekeepers supply this information. Hounds will be taken for training to these places, one by one.

‘HOLDING-UP’

Cubbing in August and September often involves surrounding small woods or rough bits of ground with a ring of people on foot and horseback. This is known as ‘holding-up’. Holding-up may also happen around fields of maize or large-leaved crops such as sugar beet. Families of foxes often reside there because they can creep around freely but safely under cover. Woodland or standing crop, old orchard, bramble thicket or somewhere else, a foxy place is called a ‘covert’ (pronounced with a silent ‘t’).

When hounds are first entered into covert there may be complete silence apart from the occasional toot on hunting horn or odd word of encouragement from the Huntsman. Hounds will be searching, noses down, for the smell of a fox. When one hound gets a whiff he or she will ‘speak’. That means they bark in a particular way. As other hounds find the scent too so the speaking gets louder until all the dogs are ‘on cry’ and their collective noise reaches a crescendo.

At this point the fox is darting around in the undergrowth ahead of the pack, trying to escape. If it pops out from the edge of the covert then the surrounding riders and foot followers will shout, clap and slap their saddles to make a wall of noise to scare the fox back. Even if a fox is not seen, but the sound of hounds speaking is close enough to indicate that the fox is running close to the edge, a wall of noise is created. Hunt supporters help considerably to kill foxes during cubbing.

Sooner or later the fox will be caught and killed, either above ground in the jaws of the hounds or when dug out by men with spades and terriers if it tries to hide down a hole. This happens repeatedly until the whole litter is destroyed. Some brave foxes will beat the wall of noise and get away. These are ‘good’ foxes which are hoped to run far and fast during the winter months.

HORSES & HOUNDS RUNNING CROSS COUNTRY

Cub hunting is not all holding-up. Any place likely to provide foxes is tried; hedgerows, streams, field corners, untidy back gardens, derelict farm buildings, even ivy-clad trees. Short hunting runs may be encouraged by hardly holding-up at all or on side only so that, by October and just before the lucrative full season, hounds are hunting their quarry in the open over decent stretches of ground.

Cub hunting has been illegal since February 2005. We advise always report suspected illegal hunting to the police using 101 (dial 999 if 101 is taking too long, or the suspected crime is in progress). Other people to inform are the League Against Cruel Sports via this link or for immediacy on their wildlife crime hotline 01483 361 108 and the Hunt Saboteurs Association via this link, on social media or phone 0845 2501291. All info received is important and will be recorded for future reference or acted upon immediately.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

Cubbing happens August to October on any day of the week except Sunday, usually in the morning but sometimes in the evening after working hours. Meets are often held in farm yards or fields. Groups of riders, hounds and 4×4 vehicles are tell-tale signs.

The occasion and dress code is informal, even scruffy sometimes. Often nobody wears the distinctive red coats known as ‘hunting pink’. So you may see a hunt but not actually realise it because what you witness looks like just random groups of riders or people assembled at odd times in strange places and apparently looking at nothing.

Hounds running close to or across roads would strongly suggest illegal hunting. Nobody in their right mind would risk laying artificial trails in such dangerous places where the risk of accidents is so real.

Look out too for lines of riders spaced apart at regular intervals along country lanes or in fields and woods. They could be holding-up. Listen out for the ‘wall of noise’ made by hunt followers to frighten foxes. Staccato cries of “Aye-aye-aye!” are commonplace alongside whip-cracking. The combined sound is often unearthly. Riders may converge at pace amid a lot of screaming in an effort to force their quarry back towards the hounds.

Hunts make great play of the fact that they only go to where they’ve been invited. So if a hunt is trespassing on forbidden ground or somewhere else unwelcome then there’s little doubt that they’ll be up to no good.

ACTION YOU CAN TAKE

We advise always report suspected illegal hunting to the police using 101 (dial 999 if 101 is taking too long, or the suspected crime is in progress). Other people to inform are the League Against Cruel Sports via this link or for immediacy on their wildlife crime hotline 01483 361 108 and the Hunt Saboteurs Association via this link, on social media or phone 0845 2501291. All info received is important and will be recorded for future reference or acted upon immediately.

Here is evidence of illegal cub hunting which resulted in prosecutions for members of the Meynell and South Staffs Hunt in 2012:
http://www.conservativesagainstfoxhunting.com/2012/08/huntsman-fined-3000-after-being-convicted-of-illegal-fox-cubbing/

Here is an expose of the North Cotswold Hunt apparently feeding and housing foxes in artificial homes then hunting them with hounds during an autumn cub hunt in 2014:
http://www.huntsabs.org.uk/index.php/news/press-releases/549-secret-footage-shows-hunt-feeding-hunting-foxes

On behalf of hunted wildlife, thank you for reading this and for caring.

© Joe Hashman

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18th April 2015

Who Are You?

Guest blogger Jaysee Costa explains why he’s cool with being labelled an “anti” by the foxhunting brigade who continue to cling on to a dark past.

Who are these “antis” we often hear about?

Do you know who you are?

You probably think you do, but other people may have other ideas based on just a pinch of truth and a barrowload of negative stereotypes. They may have put them all on a label that could be stuck on you forever.

I got many labels stuck on me over the years and one of them is the label “anti”. It’s not a term of endearment.

The label “anti” as a label has been used by those who regularly abuse animals – or are against laws and regulations that aim to stop animal abuse and suffering – to describe anyone that oppose what they do. “Anti” was a word used by bear baiters to describe politicians who voted for the Cruelty to Animals Act 1835 which banned their bloodsport; it was used by vivisectionist to describe those who erected the ‘brown dog’ statue at Battersea in 1906 in honour of all the dogs that had been tortured in scientific experiments; it was used by terriermen to describe the campaigners who lobbied for the Protection of Badgers Act 1992; today it’s the word used by foxhunters to describe anyone supporting the hunting with dogs ban. So, it is meant to be a negative term used to insult (equivalent to “scum”) or simply a term to warn others in their fraternity that this person “is not one of us”. It is the nasty version of the condescending “bunny hugger” or “tree hugger” which looks down on animal protectionists and environmentalists and is often embellished by claiming that it means “anti-freedom”, “anti-countryside” or “anti-tradition”.
However, this label, which most of us wear as a badge of honour, has a dangerous side. Propagandists of animal abuse fraternities have been relentlessly using it to influence the general public – plus the police, CPS and the Courts – into believing that there is something wrong with being someone that does not want animals to be abused. Animal abusers have been quite successful in getting into journalists’ minds, who then write reinforcing the negative stereotype, creating a vicious circle. For instance, people or organisations who believe in the philosophy that all animals have the right to a life without abuse are immediately labelled by cheap journalists as “animal rights activists” with the implication that there is something extreme and dangerous in such beliefs. The term “animal rights”, as opposed to “animal welfare”, is actually an old 20th century cliché. These days most animal protection organisations, despite their names and logos which were created last century or earlier, have gradually converged into a philosophy of rights and a morality of welfare where the intrinsic value of animals is recognised at the same time that pragmatism is used to resolve human-animal conflicts.
“Anti” as a derogatory label is not only used against hunt saboteurs or volunteer hunt monitors. Organisations such as the RSPCA, the League Against Cruel Sports or IFAW employ inspectors and investigators to gather evidence for Hunting Act prosecutions (among other wildlife crimes) and the negative label affects them too. Despite the fact such investigators technically work in ‘law enforcement’ as they are paid to gather evidence of crimes in a lawful, peaceful and respectful manner, and such evidence is primarily used in criminal prosecutions – not campaigning – they are not treated as such by the police and the Courts. Their evidence is treated as suspicious just because it comes from “antis”. To compensate for that they need to work on a ‘belt and braces’ approach to prove every single event which demands far more evidence than would be required in any other type of crime, and they cannot rely on their testimony or expertise because the defence will claim that they are not credible.
Investigators who take to the field to enforce and reinforce the Hunting Act have to endure the harassment and violence of hunts supporters who behave as if part of organised crime rings that prevent evidence of illegal hunting being secured. Hunting Act enforcers and reinforcers hardly ever have an adequate response from the police if they call them when they have been obstructed, attacked or robbed. All that, because they have the “anti” label. It does not matter if they explain what their job is and show that their teams include reputable ex-policemen and ex-military. They still call them “antis” and do not take their testimony and evidence as seriously as they should. This explains why there are not many prosecutions of illegal foxhunters. The police and CPS don’t take allegations of illegal hunting seriously and believe false alibis such as ‘trail hunting’ without checking they hold water. To cover for this lack of proper enforcement ‘”antis” are forced to spend valuable resources and time operating in a hostile environment full of pressures and difficulties.
Despite the fact that we’re now in the 21st century and our society has evolved so animal welfare principles form part of our modern lives, our opponents (who by nature are people that live more in the past than in the present) continue to be obsessed with these old labels, thinking that they offend us when using them. They don’t.
So yes, I am an “anti”. I am anti-violence, anti-cruelty, anti-bullying, anti-abuse, anti-crime, and this is why I support people who try to help animals in need. And I am proud of it, as most people with the same beliefs are. Naturally, as in all walks of life, there have been some who turned violent unnecessarily and who crossed the line of decency with the misguided idea that this would actually help our cause. There are so many of “us” that it would be impossible to prevent this happening since we are a very diverse bunch where all races, genders, cultures, creeds and even states of mind are represented. But you know how propagandists work. They pick on the exception and they make it a rule. You can see this all over the press and internet these days. Personally, if asked to identify just a few people to represent an entire group, I would have chosen any of the following “antis”: William Wilberforce, Mahatma Gandhi, Saint Francis of Assisi, Leonardo Da Vinci, Gautama Buddha, Pythagoras, Leo Tolstoy, Mark Twain, George Bernard Shaw, Frances Power Cobbe, or Frank Kafka (it’s nice to think that I could be seen as belonging to the same ‘club’ as them!).
Here is what happens when those who do not have any problem with violence became activists against those who do: the “anti-antis” are spawned. For quite some time people who want to continue hurting animals regardless of whether their activities are legal or ethical have organised themselves to hunt down the “antis”, so they can intimidate us away, or even worse. For those who are aware about how foxhunting works, the euphemism ‘hunt steward’ would have come to mind when reading this paragraph. Yes, these are the heavies who may have been contracted or simply volunteered to go out looking for people opposed to hunting (it does not matter who; hunt saboteurs, Wildlife Crime Investigators, charity inspectors, bystanders, etc) and ensure they cannot become witnesses of the hunt’s activities.
There seems to be a recent revival of these type of anti-antis. They sometimes don’t even hide their violent disposition, with masked faces and signs on their shirts which unequivocally advertise their cruel intentions.
So really, if there is any negative connotation to the word “anti”, this is now attached to those who created the label in the first place, because their actions reinforce the stereotype, not ours. They are the ones that want to stop people having the freedom to protest, they are the ones who want to stop people having the freedom to speak, they are the ones who want to stop people knowing what happens to the innocent animals they victimise, they are the ones who actively disrupt legal activities in favour of crime, and they are the ones who add violence where there was peace.
Sometimes, though, in this ocean of violence, propaganda and mis-labelling, there is a gust of fresh air. Recently, a district judge who was presiding a case where two “antis” had been prosecuted for aggravated trespass because of their attempts to help an injured deer that had been attacked by a hunt’s hounds, seemed to be able to see clearly through the mist. He acquitted them.
In his summing up of the case, the judge criticised the hunt and police, and praised the hunt saboteurs saying: “All of you contribute immensely to society not only in your working lives but in your free time. You deserve high praise for managing yourselves and your behaviour.”
I am proud to know who I am.
Jaysee Costa
An anti

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19th February 2015

Illegal Hunting: Beware The False Alibi – If In Doubt Call 101

Acting on information received from a member of the public, in March 2007 a colleague and I attended an illegal two-day hare coursing event in North Yorkshire. On the morning of day one, as we pulled in to a verge to let vehicles pass along the narrow lane, a police car departed the scene. We noted the registration number.

Some weeks later we presented our evidence to the police. The officer in charge happened to be the driver of the car we’d noted. He held his hands up when we quizzed him why the illegal hunting had not been stopped at the time. He was at the scene to follow up complaints about highway obstruction. Apparently the coursing officials at the gate (you had to pay to enter) told him that they were doing ‘greyhound trialling’ which was different to hare coursing. With a few cosmetic changes to how the event was traditionally run and genuine ignorance of bloodsports from said copper, coursing supporters had invented a false alibi and they nearly got away with it.

Thankfully, Scarborough Magistrates Court was not hoodwinked. The landowners fought the charges but were convicted. A celebrity chef and a Sir decided to plead guilty as a result. Good job well done by IFAW, RSPCA and the police.

In 2011 the Huntsman and Terrierman from the prestigious, Leicestershire-based Fernie Hunt were convicted of Hunting Act offences. The judge who presided over their subsequent appeal accused them of using “cynical subterfuge” to twist evidence gathered by the League Against Cruel Sports and prepared by Leicestershire Police.

I suspect that with a few cosmetic changes to fox hunting, including the invention of a new post-Hunting Act sport dubbed ‘trail hunting’, similar acts of cynical subterfuge are widespread and ongoing. This is based on personal observation and the first-hand accounts of others.

The Hunting Act is the law, not a voluntary code of conduct which individuals or organisations can choose to observe or not. This is why reporting suspected illegal hunting to the police on 101 is so important. In these times of cuts and scarce resources, modern day policing is statistics-led. So getting a Log Number which records evidence of your call means that, literally, it counts. Sometimes we know that a phone call directly results in catching criminals red-handed.

Yes, it’s a hassle. Yes, you’ll feel interrogated by the police who want to know what you’ve seen and why, exactly, you think it’s a crime. But don’t be fobbed off or dissuaded. Just as there are police who can drive you crazy with their stubborn refusal to listen or see, so there are good coppers out there who’re willing to learn and have their misinformation corrected.

Take for instance the convictions of officials from the Meynell & South Staffordshire Hunt in 2012, again for Hunting Act offences. It was volunteers from the Hunt Saboteurs Association who gathered the evidence in this case. They compared their real-life footage with a scene from The Belstone Fox. The investigating officer saw exactly what was going on, the penny dropped, and justice was done.

Don’t leave it to others. If you see suspected wildlife crime report it. Your call counts.

Joe Hashman

Photo copyright © IFAW

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